Category: Museums

Must See Attractions in New Orleans

Many tourists come to Louisiana and don’t get to visit the must see attractions in New Orleans. Some of the attractions are fairly obvious ones that most people know about while others are more off the beaten track. There are so many things to do in New Orleans.

carriage ride in the french quarter
most see attractions in New Orleans

Take the New Orleans School of Cooking, for instance. This is one of the few places that a visitor can take classes in classic Creole cooking, making jambalaya, shrimp Creole, or gumbo dishes. If you love authentic New Orleans cooking and want to know how it’s made, you need to visit this attraction and view a demonstration class.

Another attraction is the National World War II Museum. The focus here is on the remembrance and celebration of the American Spirit, courage and the sacrifices of the men and women who served during World War II. There are many relics on display and audiovisual demonstrations. Plan on spending at least half a day touring this fantastic museum, noted as being the best of its kind in the country.

Attractions in New Orleans Not To Be Missed!

One attractions not to be missed is a tour through the Garden District. If you contact the New Orleans Chamber of Commerce, you can get information on self-guided tours of this beautiful neighborhood. You will see antebellum mansions, gorgeous gardens and the way the “new rich” lived and built their homes in the 19th century.

Take a factory tour of the Old New Orleans Rum Distillery. The tour begins with a cocktail and ends with a tasting of four types of rum. See the process of distilling rum from beginning to end. This is a great way to spend some time on something novel to do outside of the quarter.

The Audubon Zoo is a favorite with adults and children alike. You will find an interesting swamp exhibit here, where, by the way, you can eat a meal of delicious jambalaya! You’ll also find a Cajun Village, and all of the exhibits, indoors and out, that can be expected at a top-notch zoo.

Jackson Square

The History of New Orleans
Jackson Square

For a fun outdoor walking experience, visit Jackson Square, a famous landmark facing the Mississippi River and is surrounded by the St. Louis Cathedral, the Cabildo and the Presbytere (Mardi Gras museum with the Katrina exhibit). Here is a great place to sit, relax and do some people watching. Jackson Square ties a lot of the different histories and sights of New Orleans together. In any direction you walk, you’ll see one of the New Orleans attractions you’ve heard about. You will come across Bourbon Street, St Louis Cathedral, Cafe du Monde, Marie Laveau’s, Pat O’Brien’s, The French Market, The Riverwalk and The Natchez Paddle-Wheeler. Take a horse drawn carriage ride and admire the picturesque area. There are so many things to do while in the Crescent City! Enjoy yourself and remember there are many things to do in New Orleans because NOLA never sleeps!

City Park New Orleans

NOMA

In City Park New Orleans you will find yourself in a 1300 acre public park. This is about half the size of New York City’s Central Park and that is one large public space, indeed! The nature and scenery here are tremendously impressive. The park was built in 1853, establishing itself as one of the oldest public parks in America. City Park is located on City Park Avenue, once known as Metairie Road. It lies along what remains of the Metairie Bayou.

New Orleans City Park
City Park New Orleans

 Within City Park New Orleans can boast ownership of the largest collection of live oak trees the world over, some as old as 600 years. If you are looking for more New Orleans travel info beyond the Mardi Gras festivities and the Garden District, take a close look at City Park. It boasts dozens of attractions for the tourist and native alike. If you travel to New Orleans, go to City Park for the Carousel Gardens Amusement Park, especially if you are traveling with kids. This quaint amusement park is over one hundred years old.

Ride the miniature train or the small roller coaster; the children will have a blast! Wooden carousels are difficult to find these days, but City Park has one of the few that remain. It is a carved wooden carousel and unique in its own way.

There is a place called Story Land within City Park; New Orleans loves to entertain children with this fairy tale-themed playground. The twenty-six fairy tale exhibits from recognizable stories that children love are ready to be climbed on and make excellent photo opportunities for you.

Ted Gormley Stadium was built in the 1930s as a public works project and then renovated in 1992 for the Olympic Trials held in New Orleans. It seats 26,500 people and is used for various games and competitions. There’s also another stadium in the park, known as the Pan American Stadium. This stadium is home to the Jesters, a New Orleans soccer team of the highest caliber. Other soccer games and school-level football games are regularly played at the stadium.

New Orleans Museum of Art

Do not miss the thirteen acres given over to create the New Orleans Botanical Garden located in City Park. Here you will find a lush collection of temperate, tropical, and semitropical plants. The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) is another do-not-miss attraction here. It is one of the best museums located in the South.

NOMA
New Orleans Museum of Art

For those who don’t play professional sports but still want to get out there and compete a little, City Park does not disappoint. Take a run on the 400 meter track (which was also used at the “Track and Field” Trials), hit a few balls on a tennis field, take out a boat on a lagoon, fish to your heart’s content in a lake, tour the bayou, or check out the horses in the stables.

If you are a lover of the arts but you also want to be outside instead of inside an art museum, check out the Syndey and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. View more than thirty works of sculpture in the beautifully landscaped garden built in 2003. Within City Park there are also historic sculptures such as the Peristyle, Pop Bandstand and the Casino Building, all built before 1920. In 1937, the Pop Fountain was built.

City Park New Orleans hosts a calendar of events such as free concerts, plant sales and various fundraising events.

New Orleans Aquarium

Audubon Aquarium

Visiting the New Orleans Aquarium is just one of the many wonderful things to do after walking around in the heat of the French Quarter. In fact, this aquarium, is a destination vacation spot on its own. Especially if you have children traveling with you, do not miss a visit to the Aquarium of the Americas at the foot of Canal Street.

Audubon Aquarium
New Orleans Aquarium

New Orleans Aquarium

Many come to this New Orleans Aquarium just to see the famous white alligator. This is also home to the Energy IMAX Theatre. These places are great to cool off after strolling in New Orleans’ humid weather.

There is a stingray touch tank and a nurse shark touch tank. The kids will love this part of the aquarium – a moment to actually feel the underwater creatures they have seen behind glass and in picture books. And how many people can claim to have actually touched a live shark? This modern New Orleans aquarium is home to more than 15,000 creatures from the sea, some exotic, rare and fascinating.

The aquarium is not limited to life in the Mississippi or the Bayou. Here you can walk through a thirty-foot long Caribbean Reef tunnel and see reef creatures that are normally seen only by divers. If you’ve ever been fascinated by seahorses, there is a Seahorses Gallery where you can watch them swim between the grasses of the water. Visit the Amazon Rainforest exhibit to take a look at anaconda snakes, poisonous frogs and gorgeous exotic birds.

The famous white alligator is an endangered species that you can see at this one-of-a-kind New Orleans aquarium. There were only eighteen of these alligators found in a Louisiana swamp. They are not albino alligators; they have blue eyes that contrast amazingly with their white skin. They are a sight to see. Cajun culture tells us that seeing a white alligator is a good omen. That should be enough incentive to get most people to the aquarium and they will be more than glad they came. Another rare sight to see there are the neon colored frogs! Talk about glowing faces!

You can literally spend all day at this aquarium. One of the best things about it, other than its inhabitants, is its location on the Mississippi river. Any good New Orleans vacation package will include tickets to the Aquarium of the Americas along with all of the other attractions. Just blocks from Jackson Square and the French Quarter, the Aquarium can take up your day or round it out with the other sights and sounds of the city.

Old Custom House
Audubon-Insectarium

Audubon Insectarium

If insects do not make your skin crawl, make sure you travel across the street to the Audubon Insectarium located in the historic Custom House. One of the city’s newly added tourist attractions, it is not only a favorite of visitors, but also locals alike.

More Historic New Orleans Buildings

New Orleans Insider Guide

 

New Orleans Buildings FREE eBook

Historic New Orleans Buildings

When visiting this great city there are many historic New Orleans buildings you must see. Of course, there is the St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square. It is the oldest continuously active Roman Catholic Cathedral in the United States. It is also the grave site for several bishops and archbishops that have served the city. Most recently,the beloved 98 year old Archbishop Philip Hannan was entombed under the sanctuary. Known as one of the city’s biggest NFL Saint’s Fan, he was truly beloved by not only Roman Catholics of the city, but many people of different faiths.

Old Ursuline Convent

Beneath the Cathedral’s floor, is also the burial site of several clergymen and early residents of the city. Make sure to take a glimpse upward to the ornate ceiling to see photos of several of the clergymen interred in the Cathedral. St. Joseph’s Church on Tulane Avenue boasts the longest aisle in New Orleans. Old Ursuline Convent on Chartres Street is the oldest surviving example of the French colonial period in the United States. Built in 1752, it houses the Archdiocesan archives and is known as the “treasure of the archdiocese.”

On Governor Nichols Street in the historic neighborhood of Treme, just outside of The French Quarter, is the home of St. Augustine’s Catholic Church. After Hurricane Katrina, there was fear that this historical church would be shuttered forever, as was the faith of many of the city’s Catholic churches. Citizens and hurricane recovery workers rallied and it remained opened. Founded in 1841 by free people of color, it is the oldest African-American church in the nation. If you are visiting during The Satchmo Festival, make sure you take the time to attend Sunday Mass. The Jazz Mass is celebrated with a standing-room only crowd. It is a favorite of visitors and locals alike. Also located in Treme on St. Philip Street, is St. Peter Claver Catholic Church. This church has the state’s largest African-American congregation. It is a ray of light to its parishioners, neighborhood, and also the city. As visitors are always welcomed, take time to attend. The gospel choir is one of the best in the city.

Take a visit to the Preservation Resource Center and discover how a Creole cottage and a double gallery Garden District mansion differ. Or take a look at a standard shotgun house and a camelback style. The Preservation Center keeps the historic and unique architectural character of New Orleans’s neighborhoods intact for both its historical purposes and for the artist and historian in us all. The New Orleans buildings are so unique to to other cities in the country. Keep your camera batteries charged and memory cards empty because you have a lot of pictures to take on your visit to New Orleans.

Historic New Orleans Buildings

 

New Orleans Buildings FREE eBook

Historic New Orleans Buildings

When visiting the area there are more historic church buildings in New Orleans you must not forget. Of course, there is the St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square. It is the oldest continuously active Roman Catholic Cathedral in the United States. It is also the grave site for several bishops and archbishops that have served the city. Most recently,the beloved 98 year old Archbishop Philip Hannan was entombed under the sanctuary. Known as one of the city’s biggest NFL Saint’s Fan, he was truly beloved by not only Roman Catholics of the city, but many people of different faiths.

Old Ursuline Convent

Beneath the Cathedral’s floor, is also the burial site of several clergymen and early residents of the city. Make sure to take a glimpse upward to the ornate ceiling to see photos of several of the clergymen interred in the Cathedral. St. Joseph’s Church on Tulane Avenue boasts the longest aisle in New Orleans. Old Ursuline Convent on Chartres Street is the oldest surviving example of the French colonial period in the United States. Built in 1752, it houses the Archdiocesan archives and is known as the “treasure of the archdiocese.”

On Governor Nichols Street in the historic neighborhood of Treme, just outside of The French Quarter, is the home of St. Augustine’s Catholic Church. After Hurricane Katrina, there was fear that this historical church would be shuttered forever, as was the faith of many of the city’s Catholic churches. Citizens and hurricane recovery workers rallied and it remained opened. Founded in 1841 by free people of color, it is the oldest African-American church in the nation. If you are visiting during The Satchmo Festival, make sure you take the time to attend Sunday Mass. The Jazz Mass is celebrated with a standing-room only crowd. It is a favorite of visitors and locals alike. Also located in Treme on St. Philip Street, is St. Peter Claver Catholic Church. This church has the state’s largest African-American congregation. It is a ray of light to its parishioners, neighborhood, and also the city. As visitors are always welcomed, take time to attend. The gospel choir is one of the best in the city.

Take a visit to the Preservation Resource Center and discover how a Creole cottage and a double gallery Garden District mansion differ. Or take a look at a standard shotgun house and a camelback style. The Preservation Center keeps the historic and unique architectural character of New Orleans’s neighborhoods intact for both its historical purposes and for the artist and historian in us all. The New Orleans buildings are so unique to to other cities in the country. Keep your camera batteries charged and memory cards empty because you have a lot of pictures to take on your visit to New Orleans.